The Crows And Hybrid World Adelaide Are Partnering To Bring You Esports

Competitive video gaming is on its way to an arena near you.

Esports are the future of the sporting industry. While already well-known, they’re fast growing in popularity; making their way onto mainstream television and even stadiums formerly reserved for traditional sporting matches.

The High School Esports League (launched by the Adelaide Crows) is partnering with Hybrid World Adelaide to deliver a National High School Esports Rocket League Championship, with the finals to be hosted by international esports identity Muselk at Hybrid World Adelaide from 21 – 22 July at the Adelaide Convention Centre and streamed live around the world. Here are five reasons why esports are changing the game.

There are dedicated esports arenas around the world

Just a couple of weeks ago, a dedicated esports arena opened in the inner suburbs of Sydney. Like other esports arenas around the world, a couple of impressively large LED screens sit above an elevated stage so audiences can easily keep track of everything that’s going on in the games.

There are plans for more esports arenas in America and beyond, and esports is projected to become a billion-dollar industry by 2020.

It’s a legitimate sport

Australia is known as a country that enjoys its sport, but an interesting shift has occurred in recent times: fewer Australians are attending major, traditional sporting events.

To legitimise esports, groups such as the Australian Esports Association have been created with the purpose of getting esports formally recognised by the Australian Sports Commission. It’ll be fascinating to watch what happens.

It’s on our television screens

Ever since Australia’s first 24-hour esports and gaming channel launched in 2016, the rise of esports hasn’t slowed. Esports tournaments have been screened on free-to-air television, and will do so again in the future.

It’s replacing the role of traditional sport

Australia is known as a country that enjoys its sport, but an interesting shift has occurred in recent times: fewer Australians are attending major, traditional sporting events.

Interestingly, viewership of esports tournaments has actually surpassed traditional sports broadcasting in recent times, and traditional sporting clubs are joining in by buying into the esports market.

They might be part of the Olympic Games

Earlier this year, it was reported that the International Olympic Committee considered adding esports to the Olympic Games. Esports even got a trial run two days before the February Opening Ceremony at the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, to see what competitive gaming at the Olympics would look like.

It’s an uphill battle for now, though, as the International Olympic Committee recently expressed concerns about violent video games. Regardless, esports competitors and enthusiasts alike are still pushing to make this a reality, claiming that esports require the same qualities – physical and mental skills – as any other sport at the Olympics.

Australian high schools are invited to play in an online Rocket League qualifying tournament. Register here.

Registrations close 21 June.